Pedal Maintenance and new wheels

Respect your pedals. They suffer a lot of abuse but just keep on going..

My pedal maintenance is simple. Every few rides, I lube the contact points with a dry lube, this avoids the annoying pedal squeak when the cleat rubs. Drop a drip into the spring mechanism while your here.

Every once in a while, I’ll crack open the axle, clean it off and fill the chamber with fresh grease. Reinsert the axle and snug it down driving the grease up through the bearings.

I’d used the muc off biogrease for this first time, and the pedals went slack really quick. Did them about 500 miles ago, this time using Park Tools grease. Spinning the pedals today, they are smooth, with a little resistance from the grease. Perfect.

Needless to say, that tube of biogrease has been binned never to be seen again.

I’d bought a new set of wheels, that come with cup and cone bearings, and what excuse do I need for another tube of grease to try. My existing greases would of worked fine, but wanted something that was quite thin, and tacky. The crystal grease is a little too thick, the park tools grease has a tendency to stain light coloured areas. The exus blue would of been my choice, however I’ve sorta stopped using it in favour of the crystal. So I’d ordered a tube of Rock ‘n’ Roll Super Web. The stuff Is amazing in bearings. It’s quite a thin grease but hellishly sticky and coats everything. It’s ideal in the hubs and loose bearings. Being a nice bright white colour, it’s easy too see where it’s applied too.

I’ve also had to replace the rear brake caliper. I’d disconnected the cable to space the pads a little further out, and when I removed the cable, the right hand arm had a massive amount of play. So I’ve ordered a new R8000 ultegra to replace it. I’ll also redo the front caliper later in the month.

New Wheels!

So I decided to splash out on a new set of hoops, and purchased the Fulcrum Racing 3.

I like Fulcrum wheels, they are sturdy, well built and easy to service. I started with the racing 5, moved onto the Quattro and now on the Racing 5.

A test spin in the hand, and that feeling of buttery smoothness was evident. These wheels have cup and cone bearings, which I prefer as maintenance is slightly easier than the cartridge bearing. The quattros need a bearing change for sure again.

I’m looking forward to putting racing 3 on the bike and having a good 15 mile ride tomorrow..

Bloody Weather

Weather Map

I don’t much mind riding in the rain, its a refreshing change. But it can be miserable as pleasurable. Large cars and trucks throwing filthy water in all directions, hidden holes in puddles and low visibility.

The Monsoon type weather we’ve been having here recently has rather dampened my riding. My chain is currently dry lubed, which means any long distance in much more than a light rain will see me squeak along the road, and a noisy bike to me at least, is incredibly irritating.

But ride I must, so its out with the overshoes, and long sleeved jerseys and off.

Wish me luck.

Drive like a dick day

I’ve no idea what was up with people today, but the driving standards and dangerous aggression was all to evident on today’s ride.

First off, I was tailgated along a narrow road, and keeping well out of the door zone, and he finally overtook, blasting his horn as he went. Sorry mate, I’ll ride anywhere I like in the damn road. He then aggressively tailgated the car in front having to break hard several times.

Next up, a delivery van completely blocking the cycle path, as I went round him in order to continue, I noticed his reversing lights as he whacked it into reverse along the path.

Didn’t even look around, almost taking another cyclist out.

Then, on a roundabout a taxi pulled out right in front of me, causing me to brake hard. Then came the close passes. Not just a few, but almost every car, and a close pass on a tight downhill bend.

I give up. The driving standards are dropping like a lead balloon. We all have to get somewhere, we all have to learn to share. Motor vehicles do not, and have never had a greater priority than anything else.

The whole mentality of the car needs to change. We, as a society cannot allow the car to dictate our city plans. Our whole outlook on town planning needs a shift away from cars, and to sustainable methods of transport. I’m all for scrapping the VED, and increasing the cost of petrol to compensate. That way, you pay less if you use your car less, more for all those pointless journeys taking little Esmeralda and Sebastian to school in a massive 4×4, where they could easy walk it.

It is possible to live without a car, or at least use it less.

Multi tools

I’ve amassed a small collection of multi tools over a few years. They are definitely something you want on every ride, just like a spare tube. Don’t skip MP when buying a multitool. It could very well be the difference of walking home, or riding home.

Park Tool IB-2

by far, my favourite, and comes on nearly every ride, is the Park Tool IB-2

It has almost every tool I’d need for simple roadside help. It’s simple, well thought out and the tools have a decent length. Very light and small. However, the tools can get discoloured quite quickly, but it has no effect apart from being unpleasing on the eye. It’s also very easy to break down, clean and lubricate. If you do break it down, be sure to apply a small amount of threadlock to the bolts, there is a tendency for it to loosen over time.

  • 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm hex wrenches
  • T25 Torx® compatible driver
  • Flat blade screwdriver
  • Dimensions: 75mm x 40mm x 18mm (2.87″ x 1.57″ x 0.71″)
  • Weight: 108g (3.8 ounces)

Lezyne RAP-21

Moving up in the tool stakes, this tool has a few more options, but larger, heavier and bulky.

It also has a bonus of a easy to use CO2 head. I find the flap for the chain tool flaps around, and the tools are a little short, as well as the small Allen keys are 90 degree angles on the head.

  • Hex 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm
  • Torx T25, T30
  • Phillips and flat head screwdriver
  • Chain Breaker: (9/10/11 speed)
  • Spoke Wrenches: Mavic Mtv, 3.22, 3.45
  • Tire Lever with open end 10mm wrench
  • Bottle Opener with open End 8mm wrench and disk brake wedge
  • Presta/Schrader Co2 Inflator

Quite the impressive list of tools. The finish of the tools is corrosion proof, and a high quality finish.
But, it’s not really a tool I carry often. Mostly due to the bulk. If I’m on a long ride, with a larger saddle bag, I might consider it, but it often plays second fiddle to the IB-2. The CO2 inflators, is always in my saddle bag, as it’s small, and a lot easier to use than the other inflators I have to hand.

Topeak Alien-II

This thing is an absolute monster. Virtually every tool you could need. But it’s seriously heavy and bulky.

Well, maybe not every tool, but each tool is strong and well constructed out of steel. I don’t think I’ve ever really had this out on many rides, it’s sat in my toolbox for a quite some time.

And the second most used tool I have at my disposal

Topeak Mini 20 Pro Multi Tool

I like this one, and it’s often found in my jersey pocket. It’s light, flat, and a good selection of tools.

Allen Wrenches
  • 2/2-L/2.5/3 (2 each) 4/5/6/8/10mm
  • T10/T25
  • 14g/15g/ Mavic M7
  • Shimano Compatible Chain Tool
  • Cast CrMo Steel chain hook
  • Stainless Steel Wire Tire Levers
  • Super Hard Anodized* (*The metal tire lever is designed for durability and for emergency use only)
  • #2 Phillips/ Flat Head
  • Hardened Steel/ with Spoke Holder
  • Chain Pin Breaker

All the tools are made from aluminium, and the body is steel. The tools are a little on the short side, but easily useable.

Easy to have in a jersey pocket, or saddlepack for when you need it, and the most common sizes of Allen keys for when you need them.

But whatever multitool you choose, don’t just let it sit there. You need to make sure it’s clean, rust free and the tools lubricated. Everyonce in a while, clean out any grit or crud and give it a drip of dry chain lube in the joints.

Wheels.. They go round.

Well, mostly they do. I use a set of Fulcrum Quattro, they are now a few years old but plenty of life left in them. But they did need a bit of TLC the other day. I couldn’t be bothered to change the bearings so I swapped them over temporarily for a set of Mavic Aksiums that I have hanging around the garage.

Look 566 2012 Mavic Aksium Wheelset

The Aksiums, are in all honesty, a cheap set of wheels and it shows in their performance. They are heavy and slow. The other thing I’d noticed, was their breaking distance is longer than the Quattro.

On the second ride with the magics, my average speed was much lower, and I had a lot more effort going into maintaining speed. Then the noise started. The constant eek eek noise from the free hub. Drove me insane.

So they have been removed, and the free hub bearings replaced in the Quattro, cycling nirvana restored.