Panoramic shots

Trying out the panoramic feature of the DJI spark. Impressed, but not blown away by it.

I found it really easy Todo, with the drone doing all the hard work taking the images, a great mode for capturing the vista. However, I find myself unable to position the drone where I want, always seeming to stop short. Not a limit on the drone, but for some reason my brain always stops in that same position!

Power of the edits..

While I always like to process images as little as possible, if at all, some times it’s a requirement of every shot.

Here, for instance this shot taken from my Spark. It lacks depth and colour. Visually, it just didn’t stand out.

However, a little time spent in the Google Photos editor tweaking exposure, clarity, saturation and blacks improve things.

Shadows have a bit more depth, the colours are less muted but still hold the autumn setting.

You don’t take a photograph, you make it

Ansel Adams

So, don’t be afraid to play with the sliders, just don’t overdo it, and keep it realistic and you’ll do just fine.

Wind.

The spark has continued to impress with its ability in windy conditions. I’ve flown it in some questionable wind speeds, bit being careful not to take it too far. So far, there’s only been one occasion where I’ve noticed it not being able to cope and that was on blubber houses crag. And by god, it was seriously windy.

Up til now, I have had no way of actually knowing the wind speed conditions, apart from looking on apps and the weather reports, so I’ve invested little more than a tenner for an anemometer from Amazon to measure the wind speed.

This will let me know exactly what the wind speed is, and honestly, for £12, it’s a good buy.

Toft Gate Lime Kiln

So it was a trip to the top of Greenhow hill today. Lord was it cold and windy. But the little Spark did a sterling effort of dealing with the wind.

Up at the top of Greenhow hill is the old Lime kiln at Toft Gate.

The kiln was loaded with limestone through the top and with coal through the rectangular openings in the end and side walls. A stone lined flue runs from the kiln up a gentle slope to the chimney base in the distance. Life must have been hard up here. I’m suffering just with the cold wind, I hate to think what it was like being up here, mining the ore and loading it, moving the spoil, let alone the children that would have had to clean out the long flue leading to the chimney.

Theres plenty of grassy hillocks and curious dimples in the landscape between Toft Gate and Grassington – many of these are remnants of the limestone industry. People would mine the area, and transport it out to the lime-kiln where it would be burnt and heated to release the quicklime, which was then used in the local farms for fertiliser.

I decided to try the editor built into the DJI Go app, and it’s not bad really. Its most useful if your away from the main editing system you use, and just need a quick and dirty instagram upload or something, it wont really replace a dedicated editing software, but its intended use its not too bad. Once you play around with it and learn what it can, and can’t do as the information on using it is a little thin, it can yeild some good results. The auto create function can be a little odd, but that’s what you get for a random selection..

A walk round Thruscross with the Spark.

Went for a walk with a willing Muse around Thruscross reservoir yesterday. Very cold, but enjoyed the company.
My initial edit of the footage was done, and I liked the outcome, however I added a few scenes from the previous visits to Thruscross and extended it out by a few seconds for the second version of the edit.

Enjoy the edits 😉

Thruscross

Spend the afternoon going round one of my favourite walks, thruscross.

This is by no means an easy walk round here, the first part if done in a clockwise direction is easy enough, but you soon get to a section that’s not easy to navigate and a difficult, almost scrambling section. There’s no path to speak of, just be careful where you put your feet, and look out for the directional markers.

The reservoir it’s self is incredibly low, I can’t ever remember seeing it this low. The bridge is now well above water in the previously submerged village of westend. The river washburn down to nothing more than a stream now. The last time the village was visible, was 1995, and now much of the visible bridge and houses have broken down, or covered by sludge. (Here’s a YouTube video showing the 1995 drought)

I shot a few clips on the way around, some of which I didn’t use in the above video, but these two I really did like and couldn’t just leave them.

And this one, I just loved the way the dam reflected in the still water.

Thruscross, with its mix of moorland exposed walks, thick dark woods, and muddy scrambles is always worth a walk.