Elemnt Screens

Going around the various forums, one of the common questions I see, is “what fields should I have?” when setting up a GPS computer.

I’d previously done this type of post for my garmin so I’d thought I’d do one for the screens on my elemnt.

First Page

The first page is pretty much on screen most of the time. It contains all the critical information.

 

  1. W 5 sec, this simply shows my 5 second average power.
  2. KPH, is my current speed. I’ve found d myself looking at power more than speed recently, so speed is relegated to second field.
  3. BPM, current heart rate I have my heart rate zones displayed on the left hand LED display.
  4. RPM, my current cadence
  5. KM, Distance travelled
  6. Elevation, current elevation above sea-level.
  7. DEG-C current temperature

I don’t need much else on that screen. Using the zoom function on the elemnt, the 4 top items are the ones that are most important and on screen in a zoom state.

Climbing Screen

The climbing screen is pretty much the default. I think I just added RPM and BPM datafields.

There is the default Elevation display at the bottom of the screen.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Screen

2017-07-24 19.34.08

Similar to the Main screen, this screen shows all the important metrics, along with a KM to go display for the currently loaded course and a ride time display too. As the Elemnt lacks the timed course feature on the Garmin, we have to remember the time we are out to beat and do it manually.

First ride with Wahoo Elemnt

So, I’ve changed over from a Garmin 520 to a Wahoo Elemnt. And despite the missing vowel, it’s a worthy Garmin competitor.

Initially, I thought the LED’s where a little gimmick, but they are actually bloody useful. I’ve currently got mine set to display heart rate zone but have also used them for average speed, and found them useful for a quick reference point.

Screen wise, it’s a lot more readable in all conditions than the garmin, with better field presentation. Speaking of fields, setting up screens on the elemnt is stupidly easy. You just select the fields in the app, and drag and drop to were you want them on screen. Nothing could be easier. Non of this many button pressing garmin malarkey.

I’d replaced the maps on the garmin with open street maps from garmin.openstreetmap.nl which where miles better than the tosh you got preloaded. You can’t replace maps on the elemnt, however they are more than good enough to use as is.

All in all, a great bike GPS unit, and one that’s earned a place on my bike. Just a shame it dos’nt support my garmin lights. Yet.

Trying out Route Overlays

I’ve tried using Garmin VIRB Edit to produce an overlay on my video, to show the metrics.

Associated Ride: http://ridewithgps.com/trips/3916087

It works quite well, even if it does stretch out the editing process.

The flow is now:

  1. Join files if required (GoPro splits files at 1.8Gb)
  2. Load into VIRB, and place GPX information with the file, aligning it with an arbitrary point.
  3. Export file with overlay and load it into Premier Pro
  4. Heavy edits in Premiere Pro and AfterEffects.

Then export and do what ever needs done with the video 🙂

Simple really, a little longer work flow than I would of liked, but it works until a better solution can be found. Garmin VIRB is great considering it is a free piece of software. And I think I’m already paying enough for the right to use Adobe…

Statistics. Damn Statistics

I love pouring over data. I collect it how I can, when I can and as often as I can.

One of the tools I use to generate some stats when I’m cycling is my Garmin 510. I thought I’d just take the time to show how I have mine setup, as there are plenty of reviews on the unit already.

So, there are a few activity profiles you can choose from. The way I have mine setup is with three profiles, Train, Commute and Race. I use Train the most, followed by commute. Train is setup to show the most information on each of the available five screens.

The first screen I have as this. Showing:108

  1. Time Moving
  2. Current Speed
  3. Distance Covered
  4. Current Cadence
  5. Heart Rate
  6. Elevation
  7. Temperature

The last two on this, elevation and temperature are not important metrics, and can be removed. But everything else, is what I’d call an “At a glance Metric”, ie, something you want to see when you glance down. This is where I have the unit display data when I ride normally, as it is the most important set of metrics.

The second screen

  1. 40Elapsed time – The total time the unit has been recording, including auto-paused time.
  2. Average Speed
  3. Average Heart Rate
  4. Average Cadence
  5. Total Ascent
  6. Total Descent

This is the screen I take in when I stop, as it shows the information as a set of averages.

The Third Screen142

Shows a little miscellaneous information I find handy to have

  1. Time of Day
  2. Sunset. Handy so you know when the light will start to fail
  3. Maximum Speed
  4. Calories burnt
  5. Battery level
  6. GPS Accuracy

The Fourth Screen

  1. Current Heart rate148
  2. Heart Rate Graph over time
  3. HR Zone currently
  4. % of max heart rate

This is probably the second most active screen I use, especially when I’m pushing. I can keep myself in a HR zone, and closely monitor when I need to push, or calm down. I find the heart rate graph to be incredibly useful to see the pattern over time.

The Fifth Screen

154I show laps on the final screen, not really something I use a lot of, but its good to have it here.

  1. Number of laps currently recorded
  2. Speed of the last lap
  3. Heart Rate on the last Lap
  4. Last Lap Time
  5. Current Lap Time

I have the profile set to Auto-Lap at 2 miles. I dont often take much notice of laps when I’m riding, but it comes in handy on RideWithGPS when I review.

When I’m done with the ride, I’ll head on over to RideWithGPS.com and look there. By far RideWithGPS has the best data handling of the main cycling sites I use. (Strava, Endomondo, Garmin Connect and RideWithGPS).

Head on over, select one of my rides on the site, and see the power you can have, to break rides down into sections, overall stats, and stats on selected parts, it really is very powerful.