Power of the edits..

While I always like to process images as little as possible, if at all, some times it’s a requirement of every shot.

Here, for instance this shot taken from my Spark. It lacks depth and colour. Visually, it just didn’t stand out.

However, a little time spent in the Google Photos editor tweaking exposure, clarity, saturation and blacks improve things.

Shadows have a bit more depth, the colours are less muted but still hold the autumn setting.

You don’t take a photograph, you make it

Ansel Adams

So, don’t be afraid to play with the sliders, just don’t overdo it, and keep it realistic and you’ll do just fine.

Backup Lightroom Tip

Lightroom is a fantastic piece of software. But if it goes wrong, or your computer goes wrong, there is a lot of work you stand to lose. So here are my top tips to make sure you can recover Lightroom if the worst should happen.

1.) Backup your catalogue files. This can be done from within lightroom. So to make sure this go to your catalogue settings, and make sure it is to be backed up. I recommend this is done on another drive, and you can specify the place on the backup dialogue itself when it does a backup

cat_settings

2.) Ensure Pre-sets are kept with the Lightroom catalogue. This is the best option for those of you who only use one catalogue. Once this is done, you can back up the entire contents of the catalogue folder, and keep all your pre-sets safe. Pre-sets include all Meta data, Import, develop, export and preferences. So by backing this folder up, light room is fully installable back to how you had it without worry. Just make sure you are not backing up the <catalogue_name> Previews.lrdata, or the smart previews folder if your running LR5. These don’t need to be backed up and only contain rendering information for previews and 1:1 viewing.

By following these two simple ideas, you can safeguard your lightoom install.

Hope this helps someone out there. 🙂

Lightroom

I use Lightroom to organise and edit all the photos I take. It is by far the best application out there for it.

I thought I might just take a minute to outline my basic work flow, and hint at a few keyboard short-cuts you may find help you.

After importing the files from my memory cards, I sort through the images, rejecting images, that are unusable, or I just don’t like. I do this by pressing x for reject on the keyboard. F will flag it. If you press caps lock, the focus will shift automatically to the next image.  If I need to see the image in the Loupe view I can either, just press enter or E. Should I have two similar images I want to compare, side-by-side I press C for compare, or N for survey depending on what I need to do at the time.

I also set the filters, so it disappears from the grid view after I reject them.

Once I have worked through, this stage, I then identify images that need work, or are ready to upload. I do this by colour. I use red for Requires Work, Blue for ready to upload.

I do this, by keeping the Caps Lock key on, and pressing 6-9 depending on the colour. (Red label 6, Yellow 7).

This is the fastest way I find of sorting through the images.

Hope this helps someone out there.